When business does indeed sucks

In a recent article I explained why I think we should all be Domain Driven.
I get some interesting feedbacks on the “business sucks” syndrome.

Indeed in this previous article my point was to make technical teams aware of the necessity for business to change in order to constantly fit its market as much as possible. But sometimes business does indeed suck.
Let’s take a few examples I’ve met in 10 years as a software developer.

The never-ending prototype

One of the most common business error I’ve met is the fast hacked prototype that goes into production, and then evolve in a maintenance nightmare because you know… It works, why should we rewrite it?
To be fair, this is one of the hardest things to do when you start a new business. The first step is to look for a market fit. This can take years, and you must be very fast to test your hypotheses. You are sending many prototypes in production, and most of them will only live for a few months. At this step this is perfectly fine.
Of course the problem arises when, finally, you find your market fit. The growth is here, more and more customers are using the prototype. This is when courageous entrepreneurs should throw all the technical stuff, and write it from scratch with more money and knowledge. More money because growth means that we can get money, more knowledge because many technical limitation from the prototype will be clear, and a more robust product can be built from this knowledge. As Francesco Cesarini would say: “A programmer will fully understand a problem only when he fixed it at least once”.
What happens instead is that the money is used to growth even faster, the prototype has to scale even if it’s not done for it, and the technical team has to deal with many domain and technical problems that should have been avoided.
Here starts the famous “we don’t have time for tests, we have to deliver”.

Head in the sand policy

This error concerns mainly big corporation. But I’m sure you already were as surprise as me to see how fast politic can become important even in small companies.
The company is big enough to have a few layers of management and different services. Because the top managements want to keep control of the company, he’s requesting the famous KPIs. Each service has different KPI, and quickly enough, most employees understand that they can earn more money by targeting the KPIs than by trying to achieve the best possible product for their customers.
Worse, KPIs might be highly destructive when the KPI from a service leads to more burden for another service.
For example, if one of the KPI for the support team is to take as many call as possible, they will quickly classify lots of tickets as critical bugs to be managed by the technical team. Just because it’s faster than trying to understand what happens to the user.
As a result the technical team might have a more work and the global delivering flow of the company will be slower.
Each service prefer to keep their head in the sand rather than trying to collaborate with other ones.

Enterprise Standards

Another widely spread error is the standardisation spree. Usually in the name of costs hunting (even if it’s more about power and control, because in the end it often cost more than local auto organization), the company imposes some methods, tools and/or architectures, without knowing if it makes sense for a given context.
For instance a policy will enforce all the teams to work with SCRUM. Or they will impose a common integration platform for the whole company.
It often happens when management confuses practices (SCRUM, Unit tests, continuous integration…) with principles (being more agile, code quality, fast feedback…).
Many consultants actually increase this confusion and deliver what they (think to) know instead of what the company need in its context.

So should we be domain driven when they suck?

I think my point in the original article is still valid. In the end the problems I described here is just that sometimes, the business itself is not Domain Driven. In the sense that they are looking for immediate profit or power and control instead of caring about the domain.
Thus we should all be Domain Driven, especially the business part of the company. And writing it like that is a bit depressing, but yeah, quite often the business part of the company does not really care about the domain itself.
In this case, we should help them to be more Domain Driven, or just leave them and go work in more healthy environment 😊

 

Ouarzy

 

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