What’s composition?

You remember that Functional Programming (FP) is all about function composition? But what’s composition by the way? Let’s explain it here with a few other useful concepts for FP, and go one step further in monads understanding.

Integer composition

A composition of integer in mathematics is a way of writing N as the sum of a sequence strictly positive. Weak composition is for sequence positive or equal to zero. It means that every positive integer admits infinitely many weak compositions. 0 is also known as the neutral element for the set of integers.

Function composition

A function composition is when we apply a function (say f) to the result of another one (say g) to produce a third function (say h). We write it h=g°f. Intuitively, composing two functions is a chaining process in which the output of the inner function becomes the input of the outer function. This is in essence functional programming.

Identity Function

A function that returns exactly its input as the output without any alteration is also known as the identity function. There is a symetry between weak composition of integers and weak composition of functions, because an identity function is a neutral element for the set of functions. Like 0 for integers, it can help in several situations to allow more composition. Which is useful, because we want to compose everything!

Which functions are composable?

Two functions are composable if their Domain and Co-Domain are compatible. Let’s imagine two functions:

  • StringToInt : s (string) -> i (integer) StringToInt is a function mapping a string (Domain) with an integer (Co-Domain).
  • TwoTimes: i (integer) -> o (integer) TwoTimes is a function mapping an integer (Domain) with another integer (Co-Domain).

Can I imagine a composition TwoTimes>>StringToInt? No because TwoTimes output is an integer, and StringToInt input is a string. The Co-Domain of TwoTimes is not compatible with the Domain of StringToInt. But the Co-Domain of StringToInt is compatible with the Domain of TwoTimes. Thus, we could define a correct composition StringToInt>> TwoTimes. Most FP patterns are just a way to wrap data so that Domain and Co-Domain stay compatible, thus composable, despite side effects.

Composable functions properties

If functions are composable, they can be associative if the Domain and the Co-Domain are suitable. It means: g°f(x) = g(x)°f .
You know for example that addition is associative.
So if g is +5, f is +10 and if x is 3, we can write: 5+ (3+10) = (5+3) + 10 = 18.
Note that, if two functions have the same Domain and Co-Domain, they are composable, and associative. The composition of functions with the same Domain and Co-Domain are called transformations, because mathematicians like to give a name to everything (and for once it seems a logical name).

How powerful is function composition?

In a few words: it allows to express complex things in a simple form. In physics for example, Lorentz Transformations are very famous. Using a series of transformation, Lorentz showed that the speed of light is the same in all inertial reference frames. The invariance of light speed is one of the postulates of Einstein’s Special Relativity theory.

Of course we’re not Einstein, but expressing complex things in a simple form is definitely something interesting for software design.

 

About Inheritance and Composition

Like for dependency injection, heritage and composition are easily misundertsood.

We remember that programs written in Oriented Object Programming (OOP ) are designed by making them out of objects that interact with one another. Technically, we have two possibilities to share code in an OOP style: either composition or inheritance.

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Composition

The purpose of composition is to make wholes out of parts. These wholes (or components) will collaborate to achieve a common goal.
Composition has a natural translation in the real world. A car has 4 wheels. Without the wheels the car is still a car, but it loses its ability to move.
Back to code, a bank account might need a print service. Without the print service, the bank account is still a bank account, but it loses its ability to be printed. It is a “has a” relationship.

composition

Inheritance

Inheritance allows expressing and ordering concepts from generalized to specialized in a classification hierarchy.
The meaning of a class is visible in the inputs and outputs (public contract) of the class. As a child of a class, we are implicitly accepting responsibility for the public contract of the superclass. We are tightly coupled to this superclass: it is a “is a” relationship.
A human being is a mammal. No exceptions, all mammals have a neocortex. Without the neocortex, we are no longer mammals. Back to code, I may design a “human” child class, inheriting a “mammal” base class, both sharing a NeoCortex property.

 inheritance

Common mistake

The problem’s root is that sharing code can be done either by composition or by inheritance, but the impacts are not the same.
Any class can be composed by other classes because it requires their capabilities.
But with inheritance, the key is to decide if we accept responsibilities from the public contract of the superclass. If our parent has some capabilities/properties we don’t need, we deny a part of the responsibility. The “is a” relationship is broken as soon as there is something in the parent that isn’t true for the child. Adding responsibilities in the parent because “some children might need it” is not ok. All children need it, or we need another abstraction, or we need composition.
It is a problem because inheritance implies tight coupling. A refactoring of a capability can impact all the children of a base class. If one of the children does not use the refactored capability, it should not be impacted.

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Example

Lots of modern languages use the concept of ViewModel, even if it may be called otherwise. It is appealing to build a ViewModelBase with everything any children might need, like the ability to be printed, or to show a dialog box.
What happens when a child inherits this ViewModelBase but doesn’t need to be printed or to show dialogs? It accepts responsibilities that does not make sense for it. The signature and the meaning of the class are blurred. Without these printing or show dialog ability, the ViewModel is still a ViewModel.

On the other hand, implementing a RaisePropertyChanged function in ViewModelBase makes sense, because any ViewModel is by definition glue between the business logic and the view. It needs the ability to inform the view when a property is updated. Without this ability, it’s no longer a ViewModel. choosing-the-best-local-seo-company

How to choose?

The mantra “favor composition over inheritance”  is helpful, but as every mantra it is limited. It is true because sharing behaviours is always possible by composition, and will be more decoupled, but it is not always the wiser choice.

I think the “has a” vs “is a” relationship, and the reminder that every children must take the full responsibility of the parent in case of inheritance is enough to help choosing the best option.