How do you teach DDD?

The more I work using Domain Driven Design in my daily job, the more I face how hard it is to teach. What’s the matter here? Why is DDD so often misunderstood? Of course, we can just consider that it’s a complex thing, hence requiring lots of knowledge and practices to be mastered. But let’s be more constructive and try to find the root problem in the domain of DDD teaching.

Like always, we need to agree on the terms we’ll use through this post.

Reminder: DDD

DDD is about tackling the complexity of the domain in the heart of software. It means that, in an ideal world, your software must be as complex as the problem it’s solving. Plus, the problem you solve must be the most valuable possible thing for your company. DDD provides patterns to address these points (spoiler alert: it’s not an easy task). Implementing DDD is all about analyzing dependencies.

Reminder: Tactical patterns

Tactical patterns are the most concrete parts for us developers because it’s about code! It’s a set of technical tools to concretely apply a DDD approach where it matters the most. These patterns evolve quickly, at the same speed as good practices. A well-known example is the repository pattern. Tactical patterns help to know how to build each part of a business.

 

Reminder: Strategic patterns

Strategic patterns are more abstract. They allow to categorize the domain (the business) into subdomains, in order to know how to build context of applications around it. Each context has a specific common business language (the ubiquitous language) and use precise way to communicate. Does a context impose things to another context? Do they share a kernel? How do they communicate? All of this can be captured using strategic patterns. They help to know what the different parts of the business are, and how they interact.

 

The DDD usual problems

Since I start studying DDD in 2012, I meet two recurrent problems.
The first is that newcomers (including me) do not know where to start. They can feel DDD is huge, but the reference books are intimidating. The community of smart peoples using words you never heard before seems nice, but you feel so stupid around them that it’s hard to stay.
The second one is that most people (yep, was me again) will not grab the duality of strategic versus tactical patterns at first glance. Worse, they may stay focus on the tactical patterns because they seem more concrete. We already know some of them, like factories or layered architecture. The consequence could be that we overlook the strategic patterns.

Root cause analysis

Following the principles of good design, how can we improve DDD so that these mistakes are harder to make for newcomers? Let’s use my (almost) secret silver bullet for that.
In my domain of DDD teaching, I believe there are two sub domains: one is about tactics, the other is about strategies.
An efficient implementation for teaching DDD would map one bounded context for strategic patterns, and one context to for tactical patterns. We have several clues to justify this implementation.
First clue: different languages. The two contexts have specific ubiquitous language.
Second clue: different life cycle. Tactical patterns evolve quickly. Most of the patterns from the blue book can be replaced by more recent patterns like CQRS/ES or hexagonal architecture. Strategic patterns are much more durable.
Third clue: the level of abstraction is not the same in both contexts.
Last clue: the strategic context is much more important. It’s my core domain, the core values I want to share when teaching DDD. There is a clear dependence between my contexts. Tactical patterns are important but will bring much less value if I teach them alone.
I now have a part of the answer about why DDD is hard to teach: it mixes two very different contexts. Both are useful, one is more central than the other, but also more abstract, hence harder to understand.

Solution attempt

Eric was really ambitious in his attempt to improve the industry, providing both strategic and tactical views. I think the trending and the emergence of major DDD conferences across the world are proofs that he succeeds. I also understand his willing to provide something that is not only abstract, to avoid the architect ivory tower syndrome.
Still, strategic and tactical patterns are really different beasts. These two faces of DDD make it harder to understand.
How can we manage this complexity? It depends on the context (did you see that coming?). But in the domain of teaching DDD for newcomers, I would accentuate on strategic patterns, mainly bounded context, because this is the pattern that can lead to all other patterns. Then I would explain that all the industry standards good practices (continuous integration, segregation of responsibility and so on…) are mandatory to implement the core domain, and that DDD also includes them under the name tactical patterns.
Trying to go the other way around (teaching the tactical part as introduction to DDD) increases the risk of missing the core concepts.

As always, it’s not a recipe, but it may be a way to facilitate the understanding of DDD.

 
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